Filing a Workers’ Compensation Claim in North Carolina

If you have suffered an injury at work, we suggest you follow these steps:

  • Notify your employer as soon as possible
  • Get the medical treatment you need ‑ even if the injury is minor
  • Inform your doctor that you were injured at work
  • Within 30 days after the accident, report the accident and your injury to your employer, in writing(you should use the North Carolina Industrial Commission Form 18 to make a claim)
  • Contact an attorney who has experience in workers’ compensation and get a free consultation before talking to the workers’ comp insurance adjuster 

Workers’ compensation claims are often denied because the injured worker did not give enough details about how the injury happened. Workers’ comp insurance company adjusters will usually request that you give a recorded statement. You must understand that these statements can be used to deny your claim. We have seen cases where an injured worker has harmed his or her claim by answering certain questions in a recorded statement without an understanding of key terms. If you don’t have an understanding of workers’ comp terminology and/ or leave out out critical details about your accident, your claim may be denied and it could take unnecessary time to file a request for a hearing before the Industrial Commission to resolve the issue.
 
Call a Workers’ Compensation Attorney If Your Claim is Denied

If you receive a letter, or a Form 61 indicating that your workers’ compensation claim has been denied, you should hire an experienced attorney to handle your claim. Once you receive notice that your workers’ comp claim has been denied (you will most likely receive a Form 61), we recommend not discussing your case any further with the insurance adjuster until you can consult with an experienced attorney.

For assistance with your workers’ compensation claim, call us at (919) 277.0161 or contact us online for a free, no obligation consultation.
   


    

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Hemmings & Stevens Workers' Compensation Law Blog
North Carolina Advocates For Justice